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Reynold Turn’ers craft is all in the detail.

Anyone marvelling at the Cromwell man’s intricate creations of old miniature buildings will notice cladding made from small pieces of slate or schist, roofing from tin and surrounding objects weathered in moss.

Every inch of detail is there to illustrate Central Otago’s gold-mining era.

Mr Turner’s passion comes from his love of art and history, with a particular focus on the huts and churches that have stood the test of time, from the gold-rush era of the late 1800s to the 1920s.

“It’s slowly dwindling so it’s a way of recording it,” he said, of the scenes he loves to create.

A selection of his works is on display at Central Stories Museum, including one of a church, a stable and gold miners’ huts.

 

Set in stone . . . Churches are among the many miniature models made by Reynold Turner. PHOTO: ALEXIA JOHNSTON

Some of his works also feature objects such as trees made from modelling materials.

While he uses images as his inspiration, he does not necessarily copy them.

Details from two churches were used to create the one on display at the museum.

“I put my own little piece to it, like the trees with all the autumn colours.”

Crafting miniature replica buildings started as a hobby for Mr Turner 15 years ago.

An injury meant he could not continue work so he turned to his art on a more permanent basis and is now a regular at the Queenstown market.

“Everybody likes them. There’s very few people that wouldn’t stop and look at them,” he said.

In season . . . Trees are given lots of colour to illustrate various times of the year. PHOTO: ALEXIA JOHNSTON

 

Mr Turner works on his creations mostly outdoors, near water.

And he can have multiple projects on the go at any one time, which can take between two days and two weeks to complete, depending on their complexity.

“There’s a lot of work [involved]. It’s all about waiting for things to dry.”

But, as the saying goes, good things take time.

“I have a lot of fun. It’s my passion.”

To admire some more of his works, visit Central Stories Museum.