Lockdown will be challenging, but there is support

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Central Otago and Queenstown Lakes mayors are calling for calm and consideration as the country faces the new reality of living at Covid-19 alert level four.

CENTRAL OTAGO DISTRICT COUNCIL MAYOR TIM CADOGAN

Central Otago District Council Mayor Tim Cadogan. PHOTO: SIMON HENDERSON

Central Otago District Council Mayor Tim Cadogan said the announcement from the Government putting people into self-isolation for at least four weeks could seem ‘‘a bit scary’’.
‘‘It seems scary because it is so very different from our normal; but within a week this will be our new, if not normal, norm. So; it’s OK to be nervous, it’s OK to be anxious but let’s all be strong, and let’s not be scared.’’
When the Prime Minister first addressed the nation on Saturday, she had a picture of Michael Joseph Savage behind her, he said.
‘‘My parents listened to that man in 1939 tell them via the wireless that they were at war with a dangerous enemy. He told them that for the second time in a generation, our people were going overseas to fight.’’
‘‘This week our Prime Minister told us we are again at war with a very dangerous enemy; one that, if we fail, could kill far more of our people than the war Savage spoke of did.
‘‘But we don’t have to go overseas to fight that war; we just have to stay at home with calmness in our heads and kindness in our hearts.
‘‘Let’s make the people who came before us proud,’’ he said.

 

QUEENSTOWN LAKES DISTRICT MAYOR JIM BOULT

Queenstown Lakes District Council mayor Jim Boult. PHOTO: SUPPLIED

Queenstown Lakes District Mayor Jim Boult has called on the community to take a breath, understand the latest announcement and calmly prepare for the four-week lockdown period.
‘‘This is a time where humanity and kindness need to come to the fore. The hardest thing of all will be our ability to adapt, but we can and we will,’’ Mr Boult said.
‘‘There are implications for everyone, break down the implications, write a list of your challenges and then work through the solutions with whanau, friends and support services.’’
‘‘All the answers we need to understand this unprecedented time may not be immediately at hand and that is OK. Take seriously the need to network now with neighbours, particularly the vulnerable.’’
Mr Boult included stranded visitors in that consideration.
‘‘Yes, some visitors may need to be locked down in your premises for four weeks. You will need to work through the implications of that with guests and hopefully some have planned for that outcome. If not, start your plan now.’’
The council Emergency Operations Centre would continue to function through the lockdown as would council services, many of which would occur remotely. Other essential and core infrastructure services such as waste and recycling collections would continue as normal, with the appropriate safety precautions in place for council staff.
‘‘Much will need to change and adapt in the interim but we will keep you informed at every step. Finally, as the Prime Minister has said, essential services, food, petrol and pharmaceutical supplies will all still be available and there is no shortage in supply,’’ Mr Boult said.