Fixing assistance to enable reuse

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Fixing, not flinging it away, was the aim of Wastebuster’s repair revolution at the Alexandra Community Centre last Sunday.

Visitors connected with about 15 local volunteer fixers who helped find simple solutions to avoid discarding household items.

Volunteer Brian Taylor, of Alexandra, said a tip to help suitcase locks close more effectively was to use a simple graphite pencil lead.

‘‘This helps the locks go down.’’

Jeanie Johnson, of Alexandra, said a lead crystal lamp made in the Czech Republic belonging to her mother-in-law had been in her family for about 80 years.

When it was switched on the cut crystal shade ‘‘was quite beautiful’’ and by visiting the repair event she was given information about a local electrician who could fit a new cord.

Volunteer Karla Sanders, of Alexandra, showed how old bicycle rubber inner tubes could be transformed into elegant feather earrings.

A rattan and cane outdoor table was given a repair by unravelling and retying rattan binding then holding it in place using a dot of glue.

Wastebusters project manager Sophie Ward said the repair day in Alexandra was part of the Wastebusters Revolution series of events.

Part of the process was sharing knowledge between volunteer fixers and members of the community.

The aim was to bring back a sense of repairing as a normal activity, and making a behaviour change so people felt empowered to do their own repairs.

The repairs could often be quite simple, and having a volunteer fixer show people through the process made the task achievable.

‘‘Anyone can do it, you just need the time and the patience to do it.’’