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The Alexandra Contract Bridge Club has made a bold move and all of its members are winning.

The club recently relocated from its premises in Sunderland St, Clyde to a new purpose-built facility in Alexandra.

Club president Lyn Taylor, who was among the many people who gathered at the new facility last week to mark the move, said it had been a long process, but worth the wait.

The club was formed in the 1970s after two groups of players combined – a group of mothers who often met to play “rubber bridge” in their homes and a group of Dunstan High School teachers.

“When [the mothers] decided they wanted to start to play in tournaments they found they couldn’t because they weren’t [an affiliated] club,” Mrs Taylor said.

“So a public meeting was called and there was enough interest, so they formed the Alexandra Contract Bridge Club.”

For the first eight to nine years members played in the church hall where St John is now based and later moved to the supper room at the community centre.

In 1982 the club bought the premises in Sunderland St, Clyde, using debentures from members.

Finished product . . . Alexandra Contract Bridge Club president Lyn Taylor greets people to the club’s new rooms on Boundary Rd. PHOTO: ALEXIA JOHNSTON

 

 

“The reason we went to Clyde was because we couldn’t afford to buy in Alexandra at the time.”

Thirty-seven years on, the club has sold the building, which gave it some of the money needed to build the new facility, along with help from Central Lakes Trust, Otago Community Trust and Pub Charity.

“So many people have said ‘how can a bridge club [do that]?

“It’s because the committee of the time had the foresight to purchase real estate.

“We consider ourselves to be very fortunate to be in this position.”

The about 80 members celebrated the milestone with a potluck dinner at the new facility in Boundary Rd, Alexandra on Wednesday last week.

The new facility featured a room where games would be played. It also had a kitchen, toilets, office space and storage room, making it a facility other groups would benefit from, she said.