Best ways to remove makeup

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Well, here we are in August and only a few weeks away from spring, although it may not feel it with the temperatures we’ve had lately. The last couple of Mind, Body and Soul features have created this opportunity to create a forum in which to address the questions you may have with regards to skin health, makeup, body treatments and nail care.

THE BEAUTY FORUM
With Darlie Stuart

QWhy is it important to remove makeup before you go to sleep every night? I know some people who do it religiously and some who don’t do it at all. Apart from maybe a bit of makeup on your pillow case, is there a reason it should be removed?
This is a common question and rightly so, with all the new powder mineral foundations that claim to have beneficial properties and are able to be worn for longer periods than their creme-based counterparts. Makeup was never designed to be worn for 24 hours — the formulations are generally occlusive (meaning they have no ability to be absorbed) and they sit on the surface of the skin and create a barrier, and any product that has this ability to seal the pores of the skin also has the potential to block pores through eliminating the skin’s natural ability to transpire (breathe), therefore disrupting the body’s natural healing process that happens while we sleep — not to mention that despite the greasy build-up of residue, if you were to look at your pillowcase under a microscope even after one night’s sleep wearing makeup you would probably decide this wouldn’t be a great option for your best skin.
QWhat would you recommend for removing makeup, as there are so many options out there — how do you know what is best to use on your face?
I agree with you, the choices seem endless, as along with our usual oil-based creams, foaming gels and soap-free creme bars there is now the new micellar water. Cleanser is usually the product people want to spend the least on, due to the fact it will be washed off, so no need to use anything expensive right?? Whether you buy a product over the counter or prescribed by your skin therapist, you’re making a choice (and sometimes a gamble) based on what has been recommended especially for your skin type, an article you may have read in a review or through trial and error of using a multitude of different products to find the consistency and the preferred cleanser that suits your regime. Have you ever started using a product that feels great, then halfway through the bottle it feels like it stops working? This is because our skin is biological and forever adapting to our environment and internal demands. In other words, your cleanser may need to change along with your skin needs throughout the seasons, especially when wearing makeup. Ultimately, your cleansing should start with a specific emulsifying makeup remover to thoroughly remove your makeup, then you use your cleanser to cleanse your skin and prepare it for your serums and moisturiser. After all, what’s the point in spending money on the finishing product if you haven’t provided the ideal surface for absorption?
QIf you are unable to spend top dollar on the most expensive creams such as moisturisers and eye cream, would you be able to advise some affordable options that won’t break the bank?
This is where that age-old battle comes between cost and value — not all expensive creams are great for your skin and not all inexpensive creams are bad for your skin. This will, quite often, be the marketing behind a product to induce you to believe so. I prefer to work out the value of a product based on results — if aproduct seems expensive but lasts for a few months and gives you the results you want, then that product has a higher value to you and cost isn’t relevant. However, if, on the other hand, the product is less expensive but only lasts a couple of months and you don’t really get the results promised, then this product actually has cost you more, as it won’t hold the same value . . . and will be most likely sit in the bottom of the bathroom cupboard while you try the next best thing. This is where your skin consultation comes in. Chat to your skin health expert, who can guide you to make the choices that will offer the results based on your individual skin type. Become informed with ingredients, be aware of buzz words companies use to sell products, look for wellbalanced formulations that offer the higher levels of active ingredients, ask for samples to take home and try — this gives you the opportunity to see how it feels, smells and reacts with your skin and if it’s going to work well under your makeup.
– Send in your Beauty Forum questions to info@thenews.co.nz