Sustainability theme of workshop

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Understanding sustainability was the aim for Wanaka young people taking part in a film-making workshop last week.

Run by Outlook for Someday, the free workshop combined learning about film-making with discussing sustainability.

Workshop facilitator Simon Williams, of Queenstown, said the event helped young people “connect the dots” and see how their actions contributed to “the bigger picture”.

The young people were placed in teams where they could discuss and develop a short film idea, Mr Williams said.

“We talk with them about sustainability and what their understanding of it is.

“If they use film, that is a really great way for them to get their voice heard.”

Jack Sandford (11), of Hawea, was part of a group planning a film telling the story of someone dropping rubbish.

“He eats some food, and then he drops his rubbish, looks at it but doesn’t really do anything about it, and then the wind blows it into the creek.”

The film would highlight the fact the environment would not just improve on its own.

“We need to actually take action – there is a lot of garbage in the world, and people should stop throwing it out,” Jack said.

Duck tales .. Uncovering the effects of business on the environment are (from left) Claudia Paterson and Kristin Shepherd, both of Makarora.

Claudia Paterson (11), and Kristin Shepherd (11), both of Makarora, planned a film about a duck which sees the world changing around it.

“He goes from nature to the big city, and everything is chaos,” Claudia said.

The message was how business changed nature, she said.

Trash conscious . . . Becoming more aware of the world around them are (from left) Holly Davey and Nina Lee-Smith, both of Wanaka. PHOTO: SIMON HENDERSON.

A girl becoming more aware was the theme of a film planned by Holly Davey (13), and Nina Lee-Smith (12), both of Wanaka.

“She is blind to the fact there is rubbish around on the ground,” Nina said.

While researching animals and nature in a library, the girl becomes more aware of the world around her.

“Every time she goes to the library she looks and there is more trash, and she is realising there actually is a lot of litter around her,” Holly said.

Each of the young people taking part in the workshop were encouraged to enter their film for the Someday Challenge, Mr Williams said.

“We invite them to make a five-minute film of something to do with sustainability.”

Young people had until September 14 to get their entries in.

Twenty winning films would be chosen, all of which would be entered in at least one international film festival, Mr Williams said.