Lomu piece wins national writing prize for Dylan

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A tribute to Jonah Lomu has won an Alexandra Primary School pupil a prize in a national writing competition.

Dylan Clark (11) was one of six pupils to win a prize from 800 entries nationwide on the theme “Who inspires you most in your life, and why?”

Dylan, who is in year 6, wrote passionately about Jonah Lomu and won his prize for a heartfelt piece of work, his teacher, Wanda Jaggard, said.

Dylan won $750 cash and $250 worth of Sharpie, Paper Mate and Dymo products for his school, a Sharpie pack for himself and pencil case packs for his classmates.

OfficeMax New Zealand national manager of education Blair Horsfall said Dylan showed an incredibly high standard of writing in his submission.

“We were so impressed by not only the standard of writing, but the sentiment that Dylan shared when writing his entry.”

Dylan said he continued to worship Jonah Lomu.

“He’s my inspiration and my dream is to be an All Black. I just want to hear my name called when I run down the field.”

He is continuing his writing, at present working on a “Gangster Granny” piece about bullying as part of a Sticks’n’Stones initiative, and an “Ultimate Snowball Fight” Christmas-themed piece.

Prizewinning piece of writing in the national Colour Your Classroom competition, by Dylan Clark (11), of Alexandra Primary School:

“Oh Jonah Lomu I wish you were my coach. May we get a moment of silence for Jonah Lomu. Jonah Lomu is my inspiration. This man was the best at what he did. He had the speed and strength of a million men, the step of a kid bouncing off the walls and the pass of a cold that you always caught. He was just insane.

This man represented New Zealand and his team, the All Blacks, in many games. He led them to victory many times. He loved rugby and would never hate it. It was his life. I would love to be a legend like him, someone never to be forgotten. For people to cry my name shouting DYLAN! DYLAN! DYLAN! It would be the best. Jonah Lomu is in the history books and I would love to be like that.

We all know the sad fate of Jonah Lomu. He died at the age of 40. I was so sad I yelled and ran into my room. It was filled with rugby stuff and even a 30-year-old Jonah Lomu rugby card that was over my bed. I did not cry .. well maybe a bit. It was the worst part of my life (so far).

Jonah Lomu has gone down in history with his disease. Some said he would be too good for rugby some said it did not matter and he played like he never had it. But that does not matter, he was born to play. Jonah Lomu was a man who played, help his team win or cheer them up when they lost. He had pace and the strength, so I want to be like Jonah Lomu and never give up.”