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C ovid-19 has stopped some musicians in their tracks, but not country singer-songwriter Jackie Bristow, who is making the most of a bad situation.

Bristow, formerly of Gore, has lived in the US for the past 15 years and was on tour in New Zealand when Covid-19 took hold, preventing her from returning to her home in Nashville, Tennessee.
‘‘I was due to fly back on March 21 . . . but] lockdown happened and my flight got cancelled.’’

While that is not good for her and her partner, who is still in Nashville, Bristow has been able to collaborate remotely with other musicians around the world.
‘‘I had an album started before I left, so I have been finishing the record.’’

She managed to secure funding from Creative NZ, which allowed her to ‘‘finish the project, instead of just stop’’.

With that in mind, Bristow continued working remotely with a range of other musicians, including Bonnie Raitt, drummer Ricky Fataar, Australian musician Rick Price and her Nashville-based producer Mark Punch. ‘‘That’s been super positive through this time, to be able to finish music,’’ she said.

She also managed a trip to Auckland before the latest outbreak of Covid-19 to work with Rikki Morris, well known for the 1980s No 1 hit Nobody Else.
Bristow spent lockdown in Waikaia, where she was able to focus on writing music, and has since relocated to Queenstown, where she is enjoying being close to her family.

She is now finalising plans for a performance alongside The Warratahs lead singer Barry Saunders.
The duo will perform at Olivers, in Clyde, on Saturday.